᛫  

Can Baptism and the Lords Supper Go Online?

Can baptism and the Lords Supper go online?

For the next who-knows-how-long, churches in many parts of the world will be unable to gather. So pastors like me are lovingly scrambling for solutions. Theres no playbook for this. When the church cant gather physically, what can we do to encourage and nourish Gods people?

Most evangelical churches are livestreaming something resembling their Sunday service. Although one could raise questions about the wisdom of this practice, I dont think anything in Scripture prohibits it. But what about baptism and the Lords Supper? Can those two elements of the churchs gathered worship be performed remotely? With baptism, it depends on what you mean; with the Lords Supper, it’s a definite no.

Let me underscore that my goal in this piece is not to slap any pastors wrists, but simply to look to Scripture for guidance. When we have few practical precedents to appeal to, its even more important to let Gods all-sufficient Word direct our steps.

Well consider baptism first, then the Lords Supper.

Baptism

In Matthew 28:19, Jesus commands, Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. Our most basic question here is, can this be done without face-to-face contact between the baptizer and the baptizee? The Greek word rendered baptize means to dunk in liquid. The point of the ordinance is that the external act of submersion in water signifies the spiritual reality of union with Christ in his death, burial, and resurrection (Rom. 6:14). In Jesuss command here, the responsibility to baptize lies with those making disciples; the responsibility to get baptized lies with the one who has become a disciple. The disciple-maker dunks; the disciple-made gets dunked.

So I dont think a virtual solution is possible here. The command is not tell them to baptize themselves, but baptize them.

In these extraordinary times, however, I do think it’s permissible for a church to be flexible about how it baptizes. (Its also worth considering whether it might be prudent to delay baptizing until we can all gather again.) For instance, it’s normally fitting for baptism to take place in a gathering of the whole congregation. This is because baptism isn’t only a personal profession of faith, but also how the church publicly endorses a believers profession and thereby enfolds them into their membership (Acts 2:3841).

Can those two elements of the churchs gathered worship be performed remotely? With baptism, it depends on what you mean; with the Lords Supper, its a definite no.

Baptism binds the one to the many. And having the whole many witness the act wonderfully underscores this. But when the many are prohibited from gathering, I think it’s entirely permissible for a pastor, as an authorized representative of the congregation, to baptize someone in a less public setting. After all, Philips baptism of the Ethiopian eunuch had no more witnesses than those who could fit in the eunuchs chariot (Acts 8:38). A baptism in a bathtub may be irregular, but its still a baptism.

Lords Supper

The same cant be said, though, for a Lords Supper carried out when the church is scattered. Thats because the physical act of gathering is essential, not incidental, to the ordinance. In 1 Corinthians 11, Paul refers five times to the fact that they celebrate the Lords Supper when they all come together as a church, as one assembly meeting in one place at one time (e.g., For, in the first place, when you come together as a church, I hear that there are divisions among you, 1 Cor. 11:18; cf. vv. 17, 20, 33, 34).

But is this just what they happened to do, or what we must do? Is the churchs physical presence with each other essential to the ordinance? Paul would say yes. Consider 1 Corinthians 10:17: Because there is one bread, we who are many are one body, for we all partake of the one bread. The Lords Supper enacts the churchs unity. It consummates the churchs oneness. It gathers up the many who partake of the same elements together, in the same place, and makes them one. (So if baptism binds the one to the many, the Lord’s Supper makes the many one.) So to make the Lords Supper into something other than a meal of the whole church, sitting down together in the same room, is to make it something other than the Lords Supper.

To make the Lords Supper into something other than a meal of the whole church, sitting down together in the same room, is to make it something other than the Lords Supper.

So, its not the case that a virtually mediated, physically dispersed Lords Supper is less than optimal: its simply not the Lords Supper.

This Meal and That Meal

All suffering involves loss; every loss is a form of suffering. Right now, amid much other loss and suffering, Christians around the world are suffering the loss of weekly, face-to-face fellowship with one another. Compassion prompts us to mitigate that loss however we can. But we cant erase it. And so we should learn what God would teach us through the temporary loss of these embodied, tangible, necessarily face-to-face ordinances, especially the Lords Supper. The house of feastingtogether, on Christ, in his Supperis closed for now. What will you learn in this providentially ordered visit to the house of mourning (Eccles. 7:2, 4)?

Its not the case that a virtually mediated, physically dispersed Lords Supper is less than optimal: its simply not the Lords Supper.

The Lords Supper itself is meant not only to satisfy our hearts with Christs goodness, but also to stoke a desire for when we will see his face: I tell you I will not drink again of this fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it new with you in my Father’s kingdom (Matt. 26:29).

Let the absence of this meal make you hunger even more for that future meal.

Article/Post Source

Get involved!

Get Connected!

Come and join our community. Expand your network and get to know new people!

Comments

No comments yet